Mapping Medieval Chester needs YOU!

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Be part of our website – add your photos to the map!

The interactive digital map at www.medievalchester.ac.uk will soon include a layer of photos of medieval locations in Chester today. We need your help to do this!

How to help:

  1. Take digital photos of medieval locations in Chester which are on our map (e.g. St Werburgh’s, St John’s, the city walls, the gates etc.)
  2. Upload them on Flickr at http://www.flickr.com/groups/1204980@N21/ (Mapping Medieval Chester Group)
  3. Remember to add a tag for each photo, identifying the subject – this is important
  4. We’ll do the rest – your photos will be added to the map in the near future and we’ll let you know!

 Your photos will provide an integral dimension to the map, allowing our users all over the world to see Chester sites for themselves, and enabling you to include your own perspectives on the city. Thank you!

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13 Responses to “Mapping Medieval Chester needs YOU!”

  1. Peter Brown Says:

    Are there any particular photos you require as I live locally and am also doing research in that area though in a much later period.

  2. cclarke Says:

    Hi Peter,
    Thanks very much for your interest. Really, we’re just after photos of any medieval locations in the city – the Rows, churches, walls, castle – anything which shows the medieval heritage of Chester in the modern city today. We’re not worried about having duplicate photos of the same location: in fact, because our project looks at subjective ‘mappings’ and perspectives on place, we’re actually quite keen to have images which represent different views of the same features. So, we’d be very grateful for any photos which you could upload onto a Flickr page. (Just please be sure to tag them so that it’s clear what location they show.) The Flickr map layer will be arriving soon…
    I’m interested to hear that you’re also doing research on Chester – what particular subject are you working on? Although we’re looking at different periods, we may have some shared research interests / questions.

  3. Peter Brown Says:

    Thanks for you reply. I have posted a series of photos under “Chester DHP” and have quite a few more to upload later on.

    My main area of interest is the development post 1800 of the area between The Barrs and Boughton. I also do work with St John’s Project. Happy to supply any additional information if you want to email me or to discuss.

  4. Phil Hirst Says:

    Dear Medieval Chester,

    I’m doing some research for a programme on medieval Chester. Is there anyone I can chat to briefly to get a sense of the geography of Chester city and what has been said the area within the walls?

    Best wishes

    Phil Hirst
    producer, freelance BBC

  5. Paul Vetch Says:

    Dear Phil,

    I’ve passed your comment on to the team and I suspect Keith Lilley (at QUB) may be in touch with you first. It’s exciting to hear of a programme focussing on medieval chester!

  6. Geraint Wyn Owen Says:

    Its nice to see that other periods of Chester history are being showcased ,with a city with so much diversity of history and culture through the ages right up to todays modern architecture its refreshing for Chester not to be known as just a roman city !

  7. Robert Tittler Says:

    I am delighted to know of the project, and of this website. My interest in Late Tudor and early Stuart Chester goes back a number of years, in projects of my own concerning civic politics and political culture in English towns generally (c. 1500-1640), the mayoralty of Henry Hardware II, and the records of early English drama in Chester (I served as a member of the Exective Board of Records of Early English Drama from 1986 to 2011, and was present at the launch of the 2007 REED volumes on Cheshire including Chester held in the Cathedral.) As you’ll know, there are many references to Chester places and playing sites in those volumes, and in their predecessor in the REED series, which was on Chester alone. I am currently working on the community of painters which thrived in Chester from about 1590 to c. 1645. (I am to give a paper on this at the Grosvenor Museum on 13 March, 2012). Though these interests are post-medieval, I shall be very interested to follow your project’s progress on the earlier periods.

    I do have one question for the moment: the Chester Guild of Painters, Glasiers, Embroiderers, and Stationers most often met in the early 17th C in ‘The Tower’, which was under the control of the Butchers’ Compny, and shared as a meeting place with several other guilds. They also met at an inn called The Golden Phoenix. To what structure does ‘The Tower’ refer, and where are these buildings on the Harleian map (or Speed’s map) ??

    Thanks for your help with this, and very best wishes for your work!

    Robert Tittler

    Robert Tittler, PhD, FSA, FRHistS
    ‘Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus’
    Concordia University
    7141 Sherbrooke St. WQ.
    Montreal, Qc.
    Canada

    and
    Adjunct Professor of Art History
    Carleton University. Ottawa, Ontario
    Canada

  8. karl william nield Says:

    What a great idea i will have some photos sent.
    I am currently doing research in chester on the hibro norse viking population which inhabited lower bridge street and beyond into hanbridge. At present i have a vast amount of information on hibro-norse activity in chester and am putting together a model of chester starting at 893ad to 1400ad.
    Is there anyone on your team that may have some information that i have not yet discovered on hibro-norse subject in chester I hope to have my displays at st john`s church through st john`s project in the near future.

    Many Thanks

    Karl

  9. Keith Lilley Says:

    hi Karl,

    Thanks very much for your interest in the project – it’d be great to know more about the research you’re conducting, and what kind of data you have been working on for the pre-Conquest period. There’s great potential for comparing Chester with Dublin for this period, but my impression is that the archaeological information for Hiberno-Norse Dublin is much greater than it is for Chester? Looking at personal names might help in the case of Chester, using later documentary sources?

    best wishes,

    Keith Lilley

  10. nick alldridge Says:

    Not a comment, but lots of interest and questions. I’m working on a reconstruction of Eastgate St in the 17thC (topographic, architectural, demographic & social), from documents, essentially by name-linkage, a bit along the lines of Vanessa Harding’s project on Cheapside.

    1. What’s your ending date? I gather from earlier postings that GIS mapping was being done with post-medieval maps (Hunter, Wood, up to OS 1875).
    2. Has the GIS mapping managed to, or tried to, superimpose topographic features of these maps (like the passages that abound on N & S side of Eastgate St) onto a modern plan ?
    3. Have you tried superimposing other iconographic material (like the Anon Plan of Central Chester, Grosvenor Museum 1995.235, or McGahey) onto a modern plan?
    4. Ditto with Roman finds. I’m playing with the idea that the Roman ‘paved roads’ between barrack blocks on the north side of Eastgate St, as illustrated in F H Thompson’s map of finds (JCAS ns vol 54 1967 p.10), had a relation to the passages leading down from the Corn Exchange to the street.
    5. I shall be in Chester copying documents in early August. Any chance of a chat with someone?

    Kind regards,
    Nick Alldridge

  11. cclarke Says:

    Hi Nick,
    Thanks very much for your interest in the project. Yes, we did look at later maps as part of the process of retrogressive plan analysis. Keith Lilley led the mapping work and he’ll be the best person to reply to your questions – I’ll put him in touch with you. The whole project team will be in Chester at the end of July for some project activities / events (July 24th) if you’re around then?

  12. nick alldridge Says:

    28 Sept 2013

    Hi, Catherine,
    Thanks for the immediate reply. I couldn’t be in Chester in July, unfortunately. But I’ve still not heard from Keith Lilley.
    Since May, I have become even keener to establish a link with him because I’ve drafted an article which has some bearing on your work : an attempt to plot land-use and tenurial zoning at the cross-roads of Chester in the later Middle Ages (1300-1600), with especial reference to the north-east corner, where Bridge St meets Eastgate St. Briefly, I take issue with ‘The Rows’ & VCH V’s map showing ‘The extent of the Rows in High Medieval Chester’, coming down more in agreement with Jane Laughton’s view. But I bring in new evidence, and also underline two underexploited methodological resources. I’m flattered to find an earlier article of mine (JCAS vol 64) so frequently cited on your map, but I’m keen to move on, building on more recent work – ‘Rows’, VCH, Laughton and your ‘Mapping the Medieval city’ volume. For that, I need up-to-date academic opinion, but there are so many academics who won’t reply.
    So, if you are able to nudge Keith Lilley into providing me with a contact url – or better, address – for surface mail to which i could send my draft + diagrams, I’d be very grateful.
    Kind regards,
    Nick Alldridge

  13. Keith Lilley Says:

    Thanks for your questions Nick:

    1. What’s your ending date? I gather from earlier postings that GIS mapping was being done with post-medieval maps (Hunter, Wood, up to OS 1875).

    Our aim was to map Chester c.1500 using principles of plan analysis – some inf on this in our mappings sections on the web-pages.

    2. Has the GIS mapping managed to, or tried to, superimpose topographic features of these maps (like the passages that abound on N & S side of Eastgate St) onto a modern plan ?

    We digitized from the Board of Health plans all streets and plots that seemed to relate to earlier antecedent patterns shown by historic maps and referred to in documentary sources.

    3. Have you tried superimposing other iconographic material (like the Anon Plan of Central Chester, Grosvenor Museum 1995.235, or McGahey) onto a modern plan?

    We did, but perspectives do no georectify well – we did this for the Smith view of Chester.

    4. Ditto with Roman finds. I’m playing with the idea that the Roman ‘paved roads’ between barrack blocks on the north side of Eastgate St, as illustrated in F H Thompson’s map of finds (JCAS ns vol 54 1967 p.10), had a relation to the passages leading down from the Corn Exchange to the street.

    There is an EH Urban Archaeological Database in progress in Chester where Roman archaeology is included.

    all best wishes,

    Keith

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